Praying The Psalms With My Students

A Two-Way Conversation: Praying through the Psalms with my students, by Jonny Fulks I recently had the pleasure of teaching 7th and 8th grade Bible class for two days. When asked if there was anything specific I would like to cover those days, I immediately jumped at the opportunity to teach students something that had changed my life. A few years ago, I had to read a book for a seminary class. It was Donald Whitney’s Praying the Bible. Once I finished reading it, my prayer life was never the same. Fear of Boredom “How many of you,” I asked …

Something Admirable

By Cathy Windham My husband and I witnessed something truly admirable on a recent trip to Washington, D.C. It was at the very end of our time in the nation’s capital. We arrived at Terminal A in Reagan Airport, where we saw several gates full of people standing – virtually all of the terminal within eyesight. In moments, these standing people started clapping and cheering for a special group of passengers who were exiting a plane. As far as we were able to tell, this special group of passengers were Vietnam veterans – several making a slow labored walk out …

A Classical Christian Concern for the Whole Person in the Modern World: Taking Student Mental and Emotional Health Seriously

By Dr. Seth Drown Over the past decade or more at Augustine School, we have noticed a change in student struggles. We used to have the normal behavior issues one would associate with middle school students (we didn’t have a high school then). Students might be mean to one another or disruptive or messy or lazy. We never had a lot of serious behavior problems, but there were always a few each year.  Strangely and wonderfully, as we have grown, we have noticed fewer behavior problems. It’s not that our students are sinless, of course. But by God’s grace, there …

Every Sense for Perceiving, Every Tongue for Declaring Your Creator

A common mistake in the modern cultural imagination is to draw a stark divide between the subjects that fit under the heading “humanities” and those that fit under the heading “STEM”. Many regrettable consequences follow from this error. When we separate the humanities and the sciences, we not only run the risk of neglecting the humanities proper, but we also forget that science is an inherently human endeavor.