Homeschool Hesitations

By Ginger Williams, Augustine School Parent I sat in the carpool line for the first time, straining to see if my kids would have their backpacks and know what line they were supposed to be in. Would they even be there? Maybe they had wandered off and no one knew where they were. Of course they would be there, but I still didn’t know if I trusted the teachers to watch my kids as closely as I always had. I had an unhealthy fear of something happening to my kids after homeschooling them for several years and spending every waking moment …

Lighting The Candles: A Classical Teacher’s Relational Work

By Abby Helms, K-12 Art Teacher & Marketing Director We love having people over at the Helms’ House. The first thing we did when we bought our fixer upper was to knock a wall out to make enough space for friends to gather in our living room. Several years later, we’ve nearly perfected our “people coming over” routine. First we spend time picking up clutter, scrubbing surfaces, and generally making it look like three little children do not live there. Then when everything is finished (and everything that didn’t get finished is stuffed in a closet) one of us says: …

The “Story-Shaped” School

By Christian Winters In the first century B.C., Caesar Augustus commissioned the Latin poet Vergil to write a national epic. Vergil’s poem, The Aeneid, served to form the national collective memory of the history of Rome. Aeneas, the hero of the poem, is an exemplar of the foremost Roman virtue: dutifulness. What did it mean to be a good Roman? To fulfill your duty, like Aeneas. Caesar Augustus’s hope for this national poem was fulfilled; Vergil and The Aeneid shaped the thoughts and imaginations of generations of Romans. The example of “pious Aeneas” was held up to be the premier …

Imago Dei

By Seth Drown, Upper School Dean If we hope to educate our students, it helps to understand who they are, and one of the most important things Scripture teaches us about ourselves as human beings is that we are made in the “image” of God (imago Dei in Latin). At our January faculty in-service meeting, we spent some time discussing what it means to think about our students as image-bearers with help from two recent articles in The Journal of the Society for Classical Learning (you can read them at this link). There Are No Ordinary Persons The first article …