Fairy Tales: Frightful Fiction or Wise Words?

By Lindsay Carson, Pre-K Teacher If you were to do a Google search for articles on fairy tales and the modern child, many would argue that these stories are too scary for our little ones. The sentiment is understandable: remember the wolf eating grandmother and then a little girl? Or a giant threatening to grind human bones to make bread, and even a witch who wants to kill four siblings to retain her power? As scary as these stories might seem, I want to invite you to consider this quote from G.K. Chesterton: “Fairy tales… are not responsible for producing …

The “Story-Shaped” School

By Christian Winters In the first century B.C., Caesar Augustus commissioned the Latin poet Vergil to write a national epic. Vergil’s poem, The Aeneid, served to form the national collective memory of the history of Rome. Aeneas, the hero of the poem, is an exemplar of the foremost Roman virtue: dutifulness. What did it mean to be a good Roman? To fulfill your duty, like Aeneas. Caesar Augustus’s hope for this national poem was fulfilled; Vergil and The Aeneid shaped the thoughts and imaginations of generations of Romans. The example of “pious Aeneas” was held up to be the premier …

A Good Story

When I joined the faculty of Augustine School in 2006, I was completely on board with a school that affirms an education that helps shape and form wise and virtuous young men and women who are learning to submit all things to the universal lordship of Christ. However, I was an infant in my understanding of how to accomplish this. I knew that classical education engages children in stories. But during my first year of teaching, I was asked by a parent, “What guidelines do you use to decide what is a good story?” I knew that classical education engages children …

May the Lord Keep Them

“How does he not know that she is bad?” This was the question blurted out by one of my middle school students as we were reading the story of the Red Cross Knight, the first book of Edmund Spencer’s Faerie Queene. The Red Cross Knight, who represents the Christian’s pursuit of holy living, had been deceived again by the same character that had previously caused him great harm. Having the perspective of the reader, it seemed so clear to my student. The reality for us as characters in a story, and we all are characters in God’s story, is not …